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Thinking about competing
#1
Hey, i've been doing MT for almost 2 months now, and over the summer i am going to start running 10k runs etc. to build up my stamina, just for thaiboxing. My question is, how is MT competition at amateur level? What am i to expect, and how much experience should i have until i even consider competing?
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#2
Your trainer is probably the best person to judge when you are ready for a competition, and will also give you tuition in preparing for a fight. Tournaments and interclubs are a way to step into actual full scale competition.
Good luck!
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#3
As @Happy Frog says, it's hard for any of us to say if you're ready or not, as we haven't Deen you train and we don't know what level you're at.

The most important people in this decision is your trainers, and more importantly you. If you feel like your ready and want to compete, speak you your gym and get their advice aswell, as I'm sure they'd not only want to see you fulfil your ambition, but they'd also want to see you win aswell.

Day to day training is different than competition training aswell, and its important to be able to differentiate between the two if your going to be a success.
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#4
If you are really thinking about competing in the sport, then you should watch fighting videos. The real fighting is a little different than the movie fighting. You should watch street fighting tips in YouTube videos too. There is this one guy on YouTube called Master Ken. He makes funny videos but the information that he provides is best very useful. You also need to work on your punch combinations and get a sparing partner. Craiglist is good place to look for a sparing partner. Also Facebook because it show local people. Just ask random people and don’t be afraid to ask.
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#5
(05-24-2016, 10:27 PM)tgthewriter1 Wrote: You should watch street fighting tips in YouTube videos too. There is this one guy on YouTube called Master Ken. He makes funny videos but the information that he provides is best very useful.


Master Ken is awesome
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#6
(05-25-2016, 08:01 AM)Amattyc Wrote:
(05-24-2016, 10:27 PM)tgthewriter1 Wrote: You should watch street fighting tips in YouTube videos too. There is this one guy on YouTube called Master Ken. He makes funny videos but the information that he provides is best very useful.


Master Ken is awesome

There's no doubt that master Ken is brilliant, and if you want to pick up tips via video then he's highly recommended. For a person though that's only just starting to think about competing I'm not sure that they'd be able to gain any extra from watching videos of anybody, as its all about practice and refining your own skills rather than watching somebody else.
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#7
Honestly, I would say at least a year of training before even fighting or competing. For me, the six months can be for learning the basics with some sparring and the other six months can be for strategising and working on your "style." But like others have said, only your coach can decide if you're ready to fight or compete already.

I would also recommend for you to ask yourself these questions:

1. How do you do when you're sparring?

2. Do you feel confident enough during sparring sessions?

3. Can you carry on despite being punch and hit multiple times?

You would know for yourself once you answered these questions. And lastly, what kind of tournament is this? Bare shin or with gloves and and shin guards? Bare shin fighting can be difficult and I'd wait at least a year before doing that. With the other one, shin guard and gloves fighting, it can be more acceptable although I'd wait three to four months before competing in that.

I hope this helps!
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#8
(05-25-2016, 02:33 PM)Haruka Wrote: Honestly, I would say at least a year of training before even fighting or competing. For me, the six months can be for learning the basics with some sparring and the other six months can be for strategising and working on your "style." But like others have said, only your coach can decide if you're ready to fight or compete already.

I would also recommend for you to ask yourself these questions:

1. How do you do when you're sparring?

2. Do you feel confident enough during sparring sessions?

3. Can you carry on despite being punch and hit multiple times?

You would know for yourself once you answered these questions. And lastly, what kind of tournament is this? Bare shin or with gloves and and shin guards? Bare shin fighting can be difficult and I'd wait at least a year before doing that. With the other one, shin guard and gloves fighting, it can be more acceptable although I'd wait three to four months before competing in that.

I hope this helps!

Like you say, confidence is very important when it comes to competing, and even though a person might have all the abilities needed to compete, they'll also need to make sure they'be got the confidence in their ability aswell.

Again though, that confidence will come from their trainer, and a person shouldn't be even entered into a competitive arena if there's any doubts about how they'll handle it.
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#9
I'll stress out the thing that's already been said and that's confidence. You have to have firm faith in your abilities, because you can get rocked in a fight and think you don't know anything anymore. You need to believe in yourself, take a hit and think, "alright, now it's go time".
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#10
Absolutely. Pj32. Although it wasn't in preparation for training, my trainer actually said one day, "today I am going all out at you and your head, because you need to start experiencing a hard attack at your face, so you can cope with it when it happens in a real fight". He made sure I was comfortable with it, and then went mediaeval at me. It was an interesting experience, and not one I would have liked to have met for the first time in an actual fight situation. But then, he does his best to make sure I'm meeting lots of different scenarios with him, so I am not taken by fright or surprise.
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