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Please help this beginner out!
#1
Any advice would be appreciated.

There are a few frustrations I am having in training Muay Thai for only two months.

I have experience in Tae Kwon Do and Kajukenbo which I thought would be an advantage, but it has actually been a disadvantage in sparring because I keep doing TKD and Kajukenbo moves automatically. I assume this is something that will get easier with time, but are there any tricks to remember not to block kicks with my arms and to get faster with checking kicks? Also, I keep wanting to do spin kicks and back fists, and I end up spending so much of my thought process trying to just do Muay Thai that I am really slow and end up getting my ass kicked.

Second frustration is that I came from a training school where you get lots of one on one instruction and everyone was friendly and made sure to remember my name, to a place that is not like that at all. I was thrown in to class after one day of one on one training and hardly get any attention in class. When I do get feedback it's really hard to know what they are talking about because there is so little guidance. I was told today not to snap my kicks or bend my knee when kicking and this threw me off x100-I felt like I had been doing it wrong this whole time and no one said anything so now I have to re-train myself how to kick and I really have no idea where to begin. I had told myself that Muay Thai kicks are just like a roundhouse but you use your shin instead of the ball of your foot. I'm thinking now that this was the wrong way to think about it.

Do I just need to chill out and keep going to class or are there tips and exercises that would help?

It's just frustrating seeing people who started at the same time as me (with no previous martial arts training) not having these difficulties since they started from a clean slate.

Thank you ahead of time!
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#2
This is not being presumptuous but I guess your mind is clinging to your previous orientation as you have admitted. My advice is for you to immerse in Muay Thai by watching fights. There are lots of videos on Youtube to watch that will give your mind a subtle training in orientation. And I'm sure after watching the Muay Thai fights for maybe a month or so, your orientation in fighting will adapt to what you have seen.
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#3
There are various resources to avail of in order to get a better training as far as Muay Thai boxing is concerned. I may cite a few of them here. One is your trainer, a good trainer for that matter, would get the best out of you. That is if you are good follower.

Two is the media. As being suggested there earlier, you better watch Muay Thai Boxing videos. Three, you must read journals and magazines on the testimonies and successful fights of the best fighter. And third, if this is not the last, your attitude. It depends on how you embrace this kind of sports. Whether you are serious or not.
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#4
There are a lot of good sources out there but like others have mentioned it just depends on how you learn best. Most people need to actually seen and do so you might need to start there, as opposed to reading that is.
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#5
It looks like you didn't quite get the picture of what to expect when training in Muay Thai. You may have to do some extra work of watching videos of how new persons were trained into the sport. Get the training manuals and digest them. Know that the way you were trained in Taekwondo or other form of fight could be outright different from Muay Thai.
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#6
(05-07-2017, 10:46 AM)Alexandoy Wrote: This is not being presumptuous but I guess your mind is clinging to your previous orientation as you have admitted. My advice is for you to immerse in Muay Thai by watching fights. There are lots of videos on Youtube to watch that will give your mind a subtle training in orientation. And I'm sure after watching the Muay Thai fights for maybe a month or so, your orientation in fighting will adapt to what you have seen.

Yes, you are correct in that my muscle memory is still in Tae Kwon Do mode, even though I trained about 20 years ago. I did it for 3 years, so it is definitely my reference point for martial arts. Thank you for the video watching advice, that is extremely helpful!

(05-07-2017, 05:05 PM)tpicks Wrote: It looks like you didn't quite get the picture of what to expect when training in Muay Thai. You may have to do some extra work of watching videos of how new persons were trained into the sport. Get the training manuals and digest them. Know that the way you were trained in Taekwondo or other form of fight could be outright different from Muay Thai.

I definitely understand that training any martial art differs from others. And you're right-I didn't know what to expect, like I said in my original post, I was just thrown in with very little guidance. What are these training manuals you speak of? It seems like the way my gym works, they don't really give you much guidance unless you are going to compete, which I would love to, but am obviously not nearly at that point yet.
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