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How many moves do you know?
#1
I've started muay thai about 4 weeks ago and i still don't know many moves. I am curious if when you started you didnt learn as many moves or not. How many moves do you know?
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#2
I don't know exactly how many moves I know. But back when I started, I just began with the basic moves. So that would be the:

1. Straight punches
2. Hooks
3. Uppercuts
4. Low kick
5. Blocking kick
6. Some elbow moves

And some more... But the point is, I only knew the basics. And it means that you're doing fine. You don't have to know all the moves when you're a beginner. Don't worry because as you train, you'll find it easier to incorporate new moves into your it.

I'd say that right now, I know maybe half or more of all the moves in Muay Thai. But the harder part is perfecting these moves and knowing when to use them.
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#3
It's not about "how many" moves you know, it's about how much you know one move. A fighter who trains one move a thousands times is so much more dangerous than a fighter who trains one thousand moves only once. And I think that's a pretty spot on description of martial arts, no matter how many moves and variations you know, if you do not know how to execute them properly, then you will definitely be on the receiving end of a beat down, leading to a loss.
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#4
Um, a thousand? Hard to say, there's so much room for variety. I've studied so many martial arts in the last 7 years that I probably have forgotten most of what I know, it's all just instinct and reflex or I lost it forever. Transitions are another realm too...I incorporate feints all over the place, it's one of the things I love to figure out
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#5
(06-12-2016, 11:27 PM)OursIsTheFury Wrote: It's not about "how many" moves you know, it's about how much you know one move. A fighter who trains one move a thousands times is so much more dangerous than a fighter who trains one thousand moves only once. And I think that's a pretty spot on description of martial arts, no matter how many moves and variations you know, if you do not know how to execute them properly, then you will definitely be on the receiving end of a beat down, leading to a loss.

You may not realize it, but you just paraphrased one of Bruce Lee´s most famous quotes.

I recently watched a fight from I think the 1980s where a world famous kickboxer fought a muay thai fighter... and basically the muay thai fighter destroyed him with one kick, done dozens (probably a 100) times. At the end of the fight, the kickboxer had to be taken out of the ring on a stretcher because of that one kick, performed perfectly each time.
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#6
I have been trained mostly in TKD and know most of the kicks. But as the late Bruce Lee said, you don't fear the person who practiced a thousand kicks once, but rather the person who practiced one kick a thousand times. in our TKD class, our instructor observes that most of my classmates always hit their opponents using the 45-degree kick frequently. He is quite annoyed that because of the frequent use of the 45-degree kick, we don't get to develop the other kicks. Bruce Lee may be right that he fears the person who mastered one kick a thousand times or even more. Now, that rule is more or less relaxed for modern martial arts training. Speaking of training, I might try some basic Muay Thai moves and integrate them into my existing TKD skills.
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#7
It's kind of hard for me to put a number on the amount of moves I know since I am a really unorthodox fighter and I do whatever I can in my current situation to attempt to win. I have well over 50 in my arsenal though depending on what you call a move.
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#8
(06-13-2016, 10:09 AM)PsychAL Wrote: I have been trained mostly in TKD and know most of the kicks. But as the late Bruce Lee said, you don't fear the person who practiced a thousand kicks once, but rather the person who practiced one kick a thousand times. in our TKD class, our instructor observes that most of my classmates always hit their opponents using the 45-degree kick frequently. He is quite annoyed that because of the frequent use of the 45-degree kick, we don't get to develop the other kicks. Bruce Lee may be right that he fears the person who mastered one kick a thousand times or even more. Now, that rule is more or less relaxed for modern martial arts training. Speaking of training, I might try some basic Muay Thai moves and integrate them into my existing TKD skills.

I think the Bruce Lee comment was an exaggeration on his part. But probably more accurate would be 10 strikes 1000 times. I think the point he was trying to make is the people who learn a move, practice it for a few hours and then never practice it again but say it is now part of their total moves. That person will never be able to use that move effectively against skill competition.
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#9
Yeah, nobody wants to just know 1 move to perfection, but it's that when you know a move to perfection, it is a totally different universe of a challenge when compared to a simple and basic understanding. For example, a standing roundhouse on day 1 is a weak way to hit someone in the body. On day 1,000, a standing roundhouse is a way to finish a fight dead in its tracks as soon as you have a read on when your opponent likes to throw jabs.
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#10
(06-14-2016, 03:26 AM)JustBeBetter Wrote: Yeah, nobody wants to just know 1 move to perfection, but it's that when you know a move to perfection, it is a totally different universe of a challenge when compared to a simple and basic understanding. For example, a standing roundhouse on day 1 is a weak way to hit someone in the body. On day 1,000, a standing roundhouse is a way to finish a fight dead in its tracks as soon as you have a read on when your opponent likes to throw jabs.

Exactly, that is something that came up in another thread about str vs repetition vs... You need to do the repetitions to the point where you are not thinking about technique, you have enough muscle memory that it is always perfect technique, and from there you build on the power of the strike.
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