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Hоw mаny dаys оf rеst shоuld yоu tаkе whеn yоu аrе fееling fаtiguеd in trаining?
#11
It does depend on the person, but I think 3 days of hard-effort training is plenty. Go for 4 if you want to cut back more slowly. See how your body responds to 4 days on and 3 days off, but you can also interchange other types of exercise to keep yourself fit and conditioned. Try jogging or swimming on the off days. I like to jog, but right now it's too hot for that, so find myself at the pool a fair amount.
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#12
I agree with most of the advice above. You are an individual with your own unique needs.

So trust your body when it says it needs rest, and rest until your body recovers.

You're only going to do damage if you push too far. When you work out and you are sore, those are tiny tears in your muscles --okay, so that's not news--then, you rest to recover. Your body heals and your muscles are stronger now.

But you must rest and heal completely before putting your muscles through the tearing process again.

On your healing/resting days, take whatever vitamins your routine calls for. Give your body extra nutrients to help it heal, recover and grow stronger. You will eventually notice a pattern of exercise, pain, rest, recover, exercise, pain, rest, recover.

And you'll know for yourself exactly how much time your own body needs for each activity.
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#13
I think that when you are feeling fatigues, then you should take at least 2 days off. You will feel really good and much more able to retain energy longer of you wait. Sometimes you just need to let your body take a few days to relax, and take it easy. If you keep training like that, you might just stop actually getting better.

It will start getting worse, and you will get sick because you're working out to much. Try working out every other day.
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#14
Make sure you're warming up and cooling off appropriately. When I don't take the time to warm up, I can be out of training for a week. It always seems to be when I'm trying to eek in an extra long workout that I manage to convince myself that I don't need to bother with a long warm up time. Couldn't be more wrong.

Same goes for the cool-down. If I spent an hour working out, I'll always cool down for a half an hour afterwards.

If I'm getting fatigued too long before my resting days, I'll spend more time in my warm up and cool down times while maintaining (if possible) the length of the workout.
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#15
Whenever I feel really fatigued and tired due some previous training or such things it generally takes me up to three days for it to disappear, it's something that really makes you feel like you've done things well and your effort is finally working and showing up, it's better when your muscles are burning, but it takes longer to relieve.
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#16
Everyone recovers at a different pace to one another so you have to feel for yourself how much time your body needs. If for instance on the third day of rest you feel that you have gained your strength back give it one more day so that your body can recover completely.
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#17
I would say 5 days a week is a bit excessive and your body is naturally exhausted and telling you, you need to slow down. I would take a full two days off.. Then try to start back up every other day. Skipping days in between allows your body to adjust.
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#18
(07-22-2016, 03:10 PM)willpowers9999 Wrote: My advice to you would be to listen to your body and rest as needed. However, I would also try to prevent fatigue in training by crosstraining, playing other sports on the side. It is tough to maintain focus and love for one sport, one thing that you are doing 5 days a week or more. That is why you should take the time and maybe take up a more relaxing, less physically grueling sport—golf, tennis, jogging. This relaxes your body while keeping you in good shape.

I highly agree with you, it's important to keep your body in constant movement so it does not get tired way too fast, I stopped working out for almost one month and when I got back to it it was really painful the day after I trained, I had to drink some pills to relieve the pain a little bit, it's just something we can actually take care of and eventually avoid.
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#19
3 days for me
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#20
(07-22-2016, 03:10 PM)willpowers9999 Wrote: My advice to you would be to listen to your body and rest as needed. However, I would also try to prevent fatigue in training by crosstraining, playing other sports on the side. It is tough to maintain focus and love for one sport, one thing that you are doing 5 days a week or more. That is why you should take the time and maybe take up a more relaxing, less physically grueling sport—golf, tennis, jogging. This relaxes your body while keeping you in good shape.

This is really good advice. The best way to really prevent against unforeseen injuries and things of that nature is to have a diverse and targeted workout, of varying intensities as well. It is a more holistic approach, and I think that is better when you think of overall health. I hate golf and jogging, but I certainly understand the point. Thanks for sharing and well put.
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