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Hоw lоng dоеs it tаkе tо bесоmе gооd аt kiсkbоxing/muаy thаi?
#1
I think if yоu trаinеd 3-4 timеs pеr wееk, thеn yоu will bе quitе соmpеtеnt аftеr 6 mоnths. Pеrhаps "соmpеtеnt" is tоо strоng а wоrd, but yоu will bе muсh muсh bеttеr аftеr еvеn thаt smаll аmоunt оf timе. Thе nеxt 6 mоnths will dоublе yоur соmpеtеnсy, аnd frоm thеir yоur rеturns оn inputtеd timе will bе lеss drаmаtiс, but wоrthwhilе.
Оnе оf thе sесrеts tо gеtting bеttеr is tо nоt оvеrtrаin аnd еspесiаlly: dо nоt gеt injurеd! (Thаt саn dеrаil yоur prоgrеss fоr mоnths)
Аftеr yоur initiаl 6 mоnths tо а yеаr pеriоd, yоu will bе finе tuning whаt yоu knоw, but аlsо inсоrpоrаting vаriоus tесhniquеs аnd mоdifiсаtiоns thаt yоu lеаrn frоm trаining pаrtnеrs аnd оthеr mаrtiаl аrtists.
Аs а prасtiсаl еxаmplе, my GF is gоing thru my kiсkbоxing wоrkоut prоgrаm right nоw. Shе hаs dоnе а tоtаl оf 33 wоrkоuts sо fаr. Thеsе аrе соmpоsеd оf аpprоx 21-25 minutеs оf асtuаl "fight" trаining- us bоth wоrking оut оn thе hеаvy bаg with my systеm, but mе соасhing hеr аs shе's striking.
By nоw, nоt оnly dоеs shе knоw hоw tо prоpеrly thrоw аlmоst аll thе strikеs, but shе hаs mаdе hugе stridеs in hеr distаnсing, pоsitiоning, hеаd mоvеmеnt аftеr striking, kееping а vigilаnt еyе оn dеfеnsе, mаintаining а tight guаrd, nоt tаking hеr еyеs оff hеr оppоnеnt, аs wеll аs оthеr fundаmеntаl соmbаt hаbits.
Wаs shе а nаturаl? Hаrdly, thе first еxеrсisе sеssiоn rеsultеd in tеаrs, but shе pеrsеvеrеd аnd hаs nоw соmе а lоng wаy. Nоt tо оvеrsеll it, shе hаs а LОNG wаy tо gо, but it just illustrаtеs hоw а СОMPLЕTЕ bеginnеr саn bе wеll оn thеir wаy tо соmpеtеnt striking аnd fight hаbits аftеr а rеlаtivеly shоrt timе.

Whаt dо yоu think?
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#2
I think it varies from person to person. We all have our own pace of development when it comes to Muay Thai. For some, it's easy for them, especially the athletic people who are into other martial arts forms. For some, it might take some time before they can be considered to be good in Muay Thai. It doesn't really matter how long it took you to learn Muay Thai as long as you enjoy every minute of it though.

For me, I've been learning and training for about a year already and I don't even consider myself good enough. It's easy to grasp the form of the sport/martial art. But the harder aspects are the methodology, strategies, tactics, application and timing. These are the aspects that I struggle with even up to now.

Learning Muay Thai is a gradual process... It can take lots of time before you even become good at it. And you need to constantly train to hone your skills and abilities. It can take anywhere from months, to years and years as well. It's important to be patient during this time despite seeing that you're not progressing as quickly as you want to.
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#3
I'd also say that it can vary from person to person, as you'll often get people that have never done it before end up having the natural ability to become good quite quickly.

It also depends what you consider good aswell though, as being good in training is totally different to being good in a real competition.
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#4
With enough practice and dedication, you can probably be actually good at it in a few months, but that is a rare case where you actually have to be incredibly serious about it, and you really need to put your heart and soul into it, if you want to succeed quickly. It's about practicing your moves multiple times, mastering your stance and footwork, and then, for the topper, you have to practice with someone else, so you can really see your improvements.
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#5
(05-12-2016, 02:47 PM)OursIsTheFury Wrote: With enough practice and dedication, you can probably be actually good at it in a few months, but that is a rare case where you actually have to be incredibly serious about it, and you really need to put your heart and soul into it, if you want to succeed quickly. It's about practicing your moves multiple times, mastering your stance and footwork, and then, for the topper, you have to practice with someone else, so you can really see your improvements.

Practicing with somebody else like you say, is definitely a way to improve your overall technique. I think you'll often find that while perfecting aspects on your own, you'll often miss things that others can spot.
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#6
It depends on the person really.

Same with driving tests, some people pass first time with 20 lessons, some don't pass after 30 lessons, it's all in the mind.

Depends on your training to, if you know what you're doing and you have researched then 6 month will make you ok/competent enough, but not good.

It will take a couple years I think to become 'good'/very good.
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#7
You have to lose a lot before you become good at something. Some people say it takes 300 fights. Other people say that it takes a good trainer. Nobody really knows. But, if you start losing a lot then you should train and spare more often.
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#8
(05-24-2016, 10:30 PM)tgthewriter1 Wrote: You have to lose a lot before you become good at something. Some people say it takes 300 fights. Other people say that it takes a good trainer. Nobody really knows. But, if you start losing a lot then you should train and spare more often.

I'm not sure if losing a lot is the answer, but experience is definitely important like you say. At the end of the day, your not going to win every fight, and especially at the beginning but a lot of it is all part of a learning curve that you have to go through to become the best you can.
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#9
It depends on what "good" means. There's the 10,000 rule of course. It's not a firm rule but fact is the more you regularly you practice the better you'll become.

However as few people can be better than those who train them, how good you become after a specific period of time [even if it is six months] depends on how "good" your trainer is. If the trainer isn't that great then you won't be that great either.
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#10
What skill level your trainer has is important, and that's a good point to make. You might have the natural ability to be the best in the world, but if your teacher doesn't show you the right moves and the right training, then your not going to fulfil your potential.

A lot of people change trainers as they increase their own skill levels, and while moving to a different trainer is a big step, if it's better for you then it's something you need to do, no matter how hard that decision is
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