Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Coping up with failure
#1
Loss and victory go hand in hand. No one wants to fail and lose a fight. Everyone wants to be a winner but it can be only one of the two. The second has to face failure.

How do you cope up with this? I mean losing a right is capable of shattering hopes as well as will power. It has the power to male the strongest of the body feel weak. So what measures should a fighter undertake as as to cope up with failures?
Reply
#2
Life is a mixture of victory and failure whether you are a fighter or not. Based on the fights and fighters that I have watched, one thing I have noted is the resilience of the fighters. As the fight announcer would say, you need to have the heart of a fighter to survive being an MMA fighter or boxer. This reminds me of Albert Pagara, I think he is a featherweight who was undefeated and being lined up for a championship fight. The tuneup match was against Juarez of Mexico who has a chin of steel that Pagara failed to knock him out. Ironically, it was Pagara who was counted out in the later rounds. That was very painful for the young boxer because he had failed in all expectations. But he bounced back with a win and now on his path towards good fights again and maybe the championship bout is within reach.
Reply
#3
I don't particularly care if I win or lose, but obviously I always want to win (because I'm very competitive man since I was just a kid). But I think I only can get this "balance" because I know how to measure my feelings correctly (it wasn't so easy to do this, but I got it) and I don't get carried away by the feeling of frustration.
Reply
#4
(05-26-2017, 12:01 PM)Alexandoy Wrote: Life is a mixture of victory and failure whether you are a fighter or not. Based on the fights and fighters that I have watched, one thing I have noted is the resilience of the fighters. As the fight announcer would say, you need to have the heart of a fighter to survive being an MMA fighter or boxer. This reminds me of Albert Pagara, I think he is a featherweight who was undefeated and being lined up for a championship fight. The tuneup match was against Juarez of Mexico who has a chin of steel that Pagara failed to knock him out. Ironically, it was Pagara who was counted out in the later rounds. That was very painful for the young boxer because he had failed in all expectations. But he bounced back with a win and now on his path towards good fights again and maybe the championship bout is within reach.

Successful are those who take these failures as a learning lesson and motivate themselves to turn out as a winner later on. Learning from mistakes is a virtue of real fighters and those who are capable of doing so all turn out as a real winner.
Reply
#5
Victory and failure go hand in hand. In every victory, there is a tantamount failure. So as with every failure, there is always a victory.

By principle, there is no such thing as a failure for those who are too determined to achieve his ambition in life, for those fighters for their success in their fight. They treat failure as a great challenge that they have to face it squarely, seriously. It serves as their great lesson to work on until they come off conqueror or victorious. A great fighter knows no failure. If he does, he learns a lesson.
Reply
#6
(05-27-2017, 01:55 PM)Tapungol Wrote: Victory and failure go hand in hand. In every victory, there is a tantamount failure. So as with every failure, there is always a victory.

By principle, there is no such thing as a failure for those who are too determined to achieve his ambition in life, for those fighters for their success in their fight. They treat failure as a great challenge that they have to face it squarely, seriously. It serves as their great lesson to work on until they come off conqueror or victorious. A great fighter knows no failure. If he does, he learns a lesson.

Every failure teaches us something or the other. It is not the victory or failure that matters. But it is the new moves and techniques that we learn in each fight that count in th end.
Reply
#7
Those who cannot cope with defeat should not compete. In my case, I always see my losses as learning experiences, on things I need to work on to become better. If we have the capacity to learn on defeat, we can only get better.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)